Europe

Living in United Kingdom

NIGHTLIFE

Introduction

Home to famous theater greats like Olivier, Gielgud and of course Shakespeare, the UK has a wide variety of cultural entertainment options. Almost every major city has at least one theater, with London, Stratford and Edinburgh having become well-known centers of the performing arts. Every year in August, the Edinburgh Art Festival takes place across the city, with numerous comedy, theater and literary events. The famous London theater district stretches from the south bank to the West End and is home to all kinds of theaters and musicals.

Cinema has made a comeback in recent years, and most cities now have at least one multiplex and one independent cinema. Red carpets are rolled out almost every week in London’s Leicester Square for star-studded film premieres.

According to homosociety, cities like Manchester and Newcastle have reputations for their club scenes. Major live events by internationally renowned artists are regularly held across the country, with the most popular venues including The Junction in Cambridge, the Phones 4u Arena (formerly MEN Arena) in Manchester and London’s O2 Arena (formerly Millennium Dome).

Those who prefer to spend the evening a little quieter will find a cozy pub in every larger town, in which food is often served in addition to beer. The popular pub quizzes (pub quizzes) take place regularly in many pubs, in which the teams usually compete against each other table by table in several rounds.

CULINARY

Useful information

In British restaurants you always order at the counter and pay immediately. Draft beer is ordered in pint (0.57 l) or half pint (0.28 l) glasses. You take turns to the counter; if it’s your turn, you order – and pay – for the round. Until a few years ago there was a curfew. Shortly before the police hour, a bell was rung for the first time (Last Orders = last order), a few minutes later for the second time (Time = time to drink up and go home). However, curfew in UK pubs has been history since November 24, 2005. Bar owners in the kingdom are now allowed to be open for 24 hours and do not have to ring in the last round at 11 p.m.

Tip

Hotel bills often include 10-12% for service. Porters at the hotel receive around £ 1. Otherwise, the restaurant staff and hairdressers expect 10-15%. Rounds up in the taxi. There is no legal obligation to pay service charges; Anyone who is dissatisfied with the service can theoretically deduct the surcharge from the bill. However, it should be remembered that the staff rely on tips to top up low wages. Tips are usually not given in bars and pubs. However, you can invite the bartender for a drink.

Regional drinks

Tea (tea with milk) is the national drink. A hotel is particularly elegant if it offers early morning tea (wake-up call with a cup of tea).

Minimum age for consuming alcoholic beverages

In Great Britain you can drink beer and wine from the age of 16 and spirits from the age of 18. In restaurants and pubs, alcohol may not be served or sold to young people under the age of 18.

Living in United Kingdom

ACCOMMODATION

Hotels

In all big cities, especially London, hotels are quite expensive. Further information can be found under the relevant headings for the individual regions. Information from the British Hospitality Association, Queens House, 55-56 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, GB-London WC2A 3BH. (Tel: (020) 74 04 77 44. Internet: www.bha.org.uk).

Camping

There are campsites across the country. Tents and caravans can also be rented. The equipment of the campsites is in some cases rather simple, but some have children’s play areas and sports fields, common rooms, cafeterias, shops and telephones.

Other accommodation options

The standard is very different and ranges from the simplest accommodation options for cyclists and hikers to modern motels and hotels for families and groups. The accommodations are relatively inexpensive. Information from the Youth Hostel Association for England and Wales, Trevelyan House, Dimple Road, Matlock, Derbyshire DE4 3YH. (Tel: (01629) 59 26 00. Internet: www.yha.org.uk).
Venuemasters (Internet: http://www.venuemasters.co.uk/) is a UK-wide association of over 90 university institutions that can be booked for group accommodation as well as for conferences.